Munira Alimukhamedova Blackwork

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Munira Alimukhamedova started her artistic career in fashion design, creating minimalist monochrome menswear lines. She was successfully participating in fashion weeks, creating collections twice a year and selling at pop up shops and concept stores, until she hit a kind of creative block.

Munira speaks of her creative crisis as a mentally exhausting experience; an awful moment of realisation that she had absolutely no ideas for her future collections; ‘when you know that you can design, and you can create something new and interesting, but in fact you just can’t‘. It’s so difficult for an artist to have to take a step back from their work and move on to something else for a while, but that’s what Munira did, and I for one am super glad as these new embroideries are the fruits of her new artistic direction.

While collecting moodboard images for a possible future collection Munira kept coming back to images of embroideries as well as drawings by Egon Schiele, and knew she had to do something with them: she started embroidering. Munira found the process overwhelmingly calming, she was ‘solving the order of Schiele’s lines’ as she stitched. She describes a period where her only topic of conversation was embroidery; all she’d talk about was how relaxing yet simultaneously full of energy it was. She tried not to approach embroidery thinking ‘why will I need this? and what will I do with this?’ but simply enjoying the process just for the process.

Munira’s embroideries are all about the lines. She loves Egon Schiele, and uses her thread like ink on paper, mimicking his sketchy lines. Her signature monochrome style is clearly carried over from her fashion collections to these new works. I particularly love her ikat designs inspired by the traditional ikat fabrics of her home country, Uzbekistan. Her works will hopefully be available to buy soon as she has an Etsy shop in the line-up. Follow her on Instagram to stay posted.
I’ve had far too many a creative crisis in my time, it can be incredibly draining. What are your experiences? How do you keep the ideas coming?




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